L

L. B. Briggs

It’s Alright: A Truckface Anthology

The long running zine, Truckface, has been collected in 2 volumes.

Volume 1truckface-anthology

From scooping chicken salads to selling clothes to shelving books to teacher training, Truckface details years of embarrassment and missteps.This volume contains stories of rowdy backyard brawls, awful customer service, awkward social interactions, underpants dance parties, staying angry and learning how to try. Contains issues 7-11.

5.5’x7′, B&W, Perfect bound, 364 pages.

Volume 2 tumblr_n085og9xIo1raiyxjo1_500

Through strikes, standardized testing, violence, bouffant wigs, school closings, and drawings of wieners, Truckface documents the life of one Chicago public school teacher. Simultaneously hopeful and hopeless, this volume contains Issues 12-16.

5.5’x7′, B&W, Perfect bound, 446 pages.

 

Lindsy Draws

the man called uncle timThe man called uncle Tim #3

The third in a series of zines about my uncle who died in 1995 and who I never really knew. In collaboration with members of my family, I try to understand how he lived and loved in a polyamorous queer household in a Quaker intentional community in rural Ohio. Half comic book, half zine. Issue three features conversations with my aunt and some thoughts on queer community/familiy. Two colour (red and black) riso printed* throughout with original illustrations on each page. Printed by Footprint Workers Co-op

The third issue in the series of zines about my uncle who lived in a queer polyamorous household is now published. Based on conversations I’ve had with my Aunt Judy, it is a further exploration into Uncle Tim’s family/community and the values that influenced his life. To find out more about the project, you can read about issues #1 and #2.

Aunt Judy was there when I conducted the oral history interview with my Grandma that features in issue #1. In fact, it was Aunt Judy’s suggestion that we talk about Uncle Tim in the first place because she was so proud of how her had mother supported him. Since that talk so many years ago, we’ve had a long and fascinating correspondence about Uncle Tim and about what this project has meant to our family. Any silence that might have existed around his life has been well and truly broken.

Although I’ve obviously been itching to find out more detail about Uncle Tim’s life in Raven Rocks and the make-up of his unique family, what I found most rewarding was hearing about Aunt Judy’s relationship to him as a sister. It was especially interesting to hear about how that relationship evolved up until his death.

This issue features plenty of new information that sheds light on Uncle Tim’s life though, particularly about why it ended up being so separated from his biological family. Aunt Judy provides personal insights from her visits to Raven Rocks over the years as well as philosophical reflections on the life they chose to live. In this issue, I have made the choice to move the focus on from Quakerism and start looking into some of the other influential values embraced by the J. Hartzelbucks.

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