Social Justice/ Intersectional approach


Cornerstones:

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Essays:

Martha Nussbaum:

Donaldson and Kymlica:

Anarchism and Animal Liberation; Essays on Complementary Elements of Total Liberation:

Carol Adams:

  • The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory

Corey Wrenn:

  • A Rational Approach to Animal Rights:  Extensions in Abolitionist Theory

Breeze Harper:

  • Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society

Pattrice Jones:

  •  Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth

Christopher Sebastian McJetters.

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Discussion:

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Videos:

Pro:


 

a privileged vegan

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Reg Flowers

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ModVegan

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Abantu May

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The Viet Vegan

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Vegan Sista

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Antastesia

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Plant Based Bride

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veggieworld

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Wolfgang Chrapko

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mandy hiscocks

 

Lisa Kemmerer


Margaret Robinson

 


Ruby Hamad


Anastasia Yarborough


Lori Gruen


Sarah Scanlon 

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VegfestUK

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365 Vegans

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The Advocacy of Veganism Society

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Vegan Pregnancy and Parenting

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niceswine

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Cringiest VEGAN Here HAIR

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ElectricMayhem87 (Ashleigh)

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Adeija

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Vegan Positivity

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Anti

Unnatural Vegan

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à-bas-le-ciel

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Ranting Monkey

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Ask Yourself

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Banana Warrior Princess

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Independent Man

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John Frankton

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Vegan Police

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Earthling Carl

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On the fence:

Sonia Sae

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Footsoldier

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Paul Bashir

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Quotes & Summaries

Cori Wong: Feminist Friendships

Feminism is hard and complicated—doing good feminist work and doing work to be a good feminist is even harder, says Dr. Cori Wong. White feminists have a long history of ignoring intersectionality within the women’s movement; rather than leveraging differences among women as strengths and a resource, they continue to be ignored. Dr. Cori Wong developed a model of Feminist Friendship to call attention to the skills we already utilize to maintain our closest relationships as well as allow us to better engage in social justice.

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Wilfred Sellars: The scientific image of man

Kauffman: In other words, it’s not just about the world from a neutral description, from a neutral vantage point, it’s about the world as represented by people, all right? And that’s why a world that has normativity in it, that has agency in it. In the neutrally described world of science, there is no agency, that dryer, there is no normativity to me and are no values.

Massimo: That’s right and I think that’s why, the tension there I think comes out, still out of the fact that even though other scientists, even today in the 21st century suffer from physics envy. And so the physics has been, since Galileo and Newton, you know the paragon of science, and yes it is a great science, is a great approach to reality, but it is in fact the furthest away from the subjective point of view, from the normative point of view and so on and so forth. What biology gets closer and then definitely the social sciences get right there, and that’s why we have a plurality of Sciences, that’s why we’re not going to do away with the social sciences and reduce it to biology and then when we’ve got just biology reduce it to physics, that project to me is a non-starter, it makes no sense.

“Norms are not reduced away in Stellars naturalism…” and it’s important to remember that he is in fact a naturalist, he does accept the scientific image, doesn’t question it, doesn’t reject it, he’s not a mysticist, you know nothing like that. “He accommodates normativity, not as a basic ontological feature of the world, but whether as a conceptually irreducible indispensable aspect of the distinctively human activity, that ground’s those human activities,” so that I think is a very reasonable way of looking at them.

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Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership (Martha Nussbaum)

Nonhuman animals have been banished to the frontiers of justice because they are unable to understand, agree to, or live by a social contract. They are thus unequal, and lacking rational autonomy, unfree. Justice for animals is difficult to specify, because their capabilities vary and may be obscure. Nussbaum agrees with the utilitarian Peter Singer that the capacity for pain and pleasure identifies which creatures ought to be included in the moral community. But the capabilities approach requires more than simply relieving suffering and increasing pleasure. Besides stopping the fur trade and other cruel practices, humanity should try to accommodate the other needs of animals to exercise their capabilities. For example, perhaps zoos should provide large predators with equipment to exercise their predatory capabilities, without giving them prey animals to kill. The capabilities approach addresses many more dimensions of the quality of animals’ lives than the utilitarian.

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Kymlicka: Solidarity in diverse societies

In the postwar period, projects of social justice have often drawn upon ideas of national solidarity, calling upon shared national identities to mobilize support for the welfare state. Several commentators have argued that increasing immigration, and the multiculturalism policies it often gives rise to, weaken this sense of national solidarity. This creates a potential “progressive’s dilemma”, forcing a choice between solidarity and diversity. My aim in this paper is two-fold: first, to argue for the importance of national solidarity as a progressive political resource; and second, to discuss how it can be reconciled with support for immigration and multiculturalism. I will try to identify the prospects for a multicultural national solidarity – a multicultural welfare state, if you will – and to contrast it with the two obvious alternatives: a neoliberal multiculturalism that champions mobility and diversity at the expense of national solidarity; and a welfare chauvinism that champions national solidarity at the expense of immigrants and minorities.

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Aragorn Eloff: Animal Liberation and the Implications of New Philosophy

Aragorn Eloff’s “Do Anarchists Dream of Emancipated Sheep? Contemporary Anarchism, Animal Liberation and the Implications of New Philosophy” focuses on the relations between contemporary anarchism and animal right/liberation through the lens of Deleuze/Guattari–inflected complex systems theory. The content is rich and thought-provoking. Indeed there is much to be gained from focusing on the interesting research findings that Eloff highlights concerning the number of vegans in the broader anarchist milieu. The insights into the rationales behind the responses are particularly illuminating. The essay also includes an engaging historical discussion of anarchism and animal liberation, which will be of general interest to many readers. The essay then focuses intently, and critically, on the abstract machine of hierarchy and domination, which leads to an important consideration of the implications that this has for the everyday practices as anarchists and/or animal liberationists.

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